Education, Schools

Ohio BATs w/Seattle

Ohio BATs stands in solidarity with Seattle Educators in proclaiming that #BlackLivesMatterAtSchool. Ohio BATs recognizes that systemic racial inequality within our schools has resulted from decades of neglect for our public education system. As educators and those who support educators, we affirm the Seattle Educators’ call for our collective awareness to this issue. We thank you for your tireless devotion to our students and the education they deserve. We thank you for your strong stand in support of our students of color. All of our children deserve champions like you. #WeSeeYouSeattleEducators
Join the Thunderclap and read about related actions here: https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/48664-blacklivesmatteratschool

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Education, Ohio, Public Schools, Schools

Teaching in Triage

triage-schools

Written by Emily Alberty.

As posted in the public Facebook group Cleveland Caucus to Reclaim Our Schools/CLE United Rank & File Educators (CURE).

I wrote this last March, after looking outside at the school playground and seeing the Cleveland police seemingly reenacting the events surrounding the death of Tamir Rice.

I feel like everyday I see posts from teachers about current or former CMSD students who have gone missing, been shot, or have been killed. Our city and our babies need help. I had to get this off my chest.

“Cleveland is a war zone,
and classrooms are the triage.
Teachers are the doctors,
to students who are on loan.

“Get to school. You can make it!”
But will their life be taken?
Walk past the memorial,
and let us give you a tutorial.
Another Cleveland kid who did not make it.

Schools are hospitals.
Poverty and violence are the infections.
Breathe, bandage, repeat.
Do they have food to eat?
Cleveland students are in this.

Why are test scores low?
Because Cleveland kids are taking blows.”

[The author of this blog saw this on September 21st. BUT the author of this blog finds it worthy to point out that the original post was made on August 29th, 2016…. PRIOR TO the unacceptable (and unnervingly similar) death of 13-year-old Tyre King in Columbus, Ohio.]

aug-29

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Education, Ohio, Public Schools, Schools

RESA—Dream Eraser

dream-eraser

*LINKS ARE IN BOLD PRINT

I would like to share my story of why I became a Special Education teacher with you and how Resident Educator Program or RESA  is affecting my life today. I grew up in a large family with many aunts, uncles, and cousins. I have two cousins who I was always drawn to while growing up. My younger cousins have diagnoses of Cerebral Palsy and Downs Syndrome. I watched them grow up and am still amazed by their accomplishments today. I knew from a very young age that I wanted to do something with my life to make a difference in the lives of adults and children with disabilities.

My early adulthood got off to a rough start with career choices and college, but in the back of my mind I always knew what I ultimately wanted to do with my life, and that was to become a Special Education teacher. People would always say to me, “why would you want to be a teacher, teachers don’t make any money.” I didn’t care about the money and I would always tell those people that being a teacher is what would make me happy. In 2005, I began working at a group home as a Habilitation Assistant for a group of adult women with disabilities. In 2008, I became a nanny for a wonderful family with four children, one who had been diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy at a young age. While working for this family, I started my college career at the age of 25. Most people have graduated from college and have begun their careers by this age, but I was determined to graduate and pursue my dream. In 2011, at the age of 28, I graduated with my Bachelors from Cleveland State University. I have never seen my parents so proud of me as they were that day I walked across the stage. I will remember that day forever. I could finally begin my teaching career! I co-taught in a 5th grade Special Ed classroom at a charter school in the Parma area for three years and then taught in a self-contained K-2 ED classroom at a public school for two years. Along the way, I decided that one day in the future I wanted to teach Pre-School Special Ed. I would have to go back to school for that. I went on to get my Masters at Cleveland State University in 2015. I sacrificed part of my summer that year because I was required to complete a second student teaching because I needed the Pre-K experience. I never thought in a million years I would be able to tell people that I have a Masters degree. It might not be a big deal to some people, but it is to me.

June of this year, I received the worst news of my life. I was unsuccessful at passing one task of the Ohio Resident Educator program, my license would expire that month, and I would not be able to teach. Why is this happening to me? What have I done to deserve this? Something that I had worked so hard for was being taken away from me, something that I had earned. Maybe teaching really isn’t my calling. Those were the thoughts going through my head. I was devastated to say the least. I will remember that day forever too. Many days of mental exhaustion and crying during my summer off, which was supposed to be a happy time spent with my daughter, my first child, born March 13, 2016. I rob my daughter of happy moments with me because I am upset every day. It is September 6th and I am still upset every day.

Because I was unsuccessful at passing RESA, in order to ever be able to teach in Ohio again, the requirements are to work as a substitute teacher for a year and enroll in a RESA college course. The short of it: I’ll have to do student teaching a 3rd time. I’ll have to provide lesson plans, assessments (even though those weren’t the tasks I was unsuccessful at), and be observed 4 times using the OTES rubric. You can check out the letter they send to educators who were unsuccessful in their third attempt here.


College? Again? I thought I was done with that. I think about RESA every day. I constantly think about what I did wrong. How can I be rated as a skilled teacher with OTES and not pass RESA? It just doesn’t make sense to me. I don’t understand how assessors who have never met me, worked with me, or even stepped foot in my classroom can determine my professional fate. Well in Ohio, they can, they did, and they will continue doing so. I’m not the only teacher in Ohio that lost their job and I won’t be the last. They need to have people fail or there would be no point. I fall into the 2% of educators who started the program the year it launched who were unsuccessful. The score reports that educators receive include the score you received on each individual task and extremely vague strengths/areas of weakness. How am I supposed to better myself as an educator if I don’t receive adequate feedback? If I gave my students feedback like we get, I wouldn’t have held my teaching position for 5 years. With the first attempt at RESA we were not provided a rubric and we received no feedback whatsoever on the score reports. It was either pass/not passed. My score report for one task on my second attempt revealed no strengths. A teacher with 4 years experience received no strengths whatsoever. How can I be allowed to teach for 5 years and then be told I’m not fully prepared to be a teacher? RESA changes on us every year. A new change this year is that there are courses now being offered to educators with 1 or 2 unsuccessful attempts at RESA. Where were these classes when I was in jeopardy of losing my job? Resident Educators can now use artifacts from previous years, but up until this point you could only submit artifacts from the current school year. Each district works differently as far as mentors, facilitators, and program coordinators are concerned. Every school participating in RESA should abide by the same rules. I have heard from far too many people of the differences in support that districts provide to their resident educators. My district failed me. The state failed me. You can read more on the enhancements for the 2016-2017 year here.

It could be a vicious cycle for those who choose to jump through the hoops of the remediation year. A teacher who is unsuccessful a 4th time will lose their license again, be ineligible for any type of license, and go back to working as a substitute and completing 3 hours of additional coursework. You can view the “Pathways to Completion” flow chart here.

Who on earth would even want to teach at that point? I’ll put that into perspective for you: 6 years teaching experience plus a year of substitute teaching. Ohio can still say that you are not fully prepared to be a teacher. But… if you are one of those brave people that will be taking RESA for the 4th time in the 2017-2018 school year, here’s a tip for you: you can buy your way out on Teachers Pay Teachers.  (Thanks Tim! )

My husband and I struggled with infertility for 2 years. That period of my life was emotionally and mentally exhausting and I never thought I would have to go through something that intense again. The situation that I am in today is just as emotionally and mentally exhausting as then. I go through a mental battle every day whether to stay in this or get the hell out. Is this remediation year worth my sanity and happiness? I think not. I love teaching and I want to teach, but I do not want to jump through these ridiculous hoops that insult my education and teaching experience.

 

 

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Education, Ohio, Public Schools, Schools, Uncategorized

The Phantom of Phalen Learning Academies: Part 2, Working the Middle-Man-Game like Pros

The Phantom of Phalen Learning Academies: Part 2, Working the Middle-Man-Game like Pros

Temporary-jobs-Wanted

***Note: Links are bold and faintly underscored***

When chain-style charters come into a new area, such as the Phalen Leadership Academy (or Learning—I have seen it written both ways) who are trying to wheedle their way into Cincinnati, they bring along all of their transient and temporary employee plans.

It is not a new ‘think-tank’ like the reformers like to taut, but rather a crew that has been trained to puppet the reform talk. This is why I wrote such a harsh statement in the first piece of this 3-part series, insisting that they (these businesses) are “cult-like”. It might seem like a million different battles with thousands of different names, but in reality it is all one greedy game, and the foundational pieces are all the same. The selling points are part of the training programs in a brain-washing manner.

June 13th, was a crucial meeting
for the Cincinnati Board of Education to “explore” the possibilities of opening an expansion charter(s) from the cluster of the PLAs in Indianapolis. The vote should not have even gone forth because the charter(s) are too new. PLA was in operation for only one year prior (2015-2016). This ‘newness’ detail does not surprise me. Tom Vander Ark, who is the original visionary of all of these privatization and personalization takeovers, was considered an education expert after he happed into a position as a suburban school superintendent. Only one school, in only one area (Federal Way, Washington), for only one single time slot of five years with no prior education-related experience or degree and Bill Gates deemed newbie Tom Vander Ark worthy of having enough knowledge to completely redo all education premises in the United States. Billions upon billions of dollars and two decades later, and Tom Vander Ark (having left Gates’ Foundation to make the millions on his own),  is still turning tricks and selling his bullshit in all forms and forums. Oh, and he is still using Gates’ and others’ money pots. Phalen charters are a sickening example of all of this.

These type of charters are notorious for rough starts while they move and jostle their own people all around. Transient environments are the last thing these community members seek. Stability is a rare commodity that children and their families from socio-financially disadvantaged areas need. But they will not reap that as a benefit from PLAs. One month (July 2015) before Phalen Leadership Academy was to open in Indiana, their reform pick (to the tune of a $100,000 MindTrust fellowship grant), was suddenly and without explanation, out of the picture. ““Yes, Marlon [Llewellyn] has done a great job during his fellowship year but will not be leading us forward as the school leader next year,” Phalen said in an email Thursday. Phalen has not responded to requests for further clarification as to why Llewellyn was removed. Llewellyn did not respond to a request for comment.” This was not a one-time fluke. Such are the broad patterns of such dysfunctional happenings with charter business startups.

“Findings: Our analyses show that charter schools had a higher principal turnover rate than traditional schools and very different principal transition patterns.” (Yongmei Ni, Min Sun, and Andrea Rorrer, Principal Turnover: Upheaval and Uncertainty in Charter Schools? Educational Administration Quarterly August 2015 51: 409-437, first published on June 26, 2014)
A Hechinger Report article stated “…nearly 30 percent of principals who lead troubled schools quit every year. By Year 3, more than half of all principals leave their jobs.”  Add this in with the fact that turnover rate is much higher in charters and one spells ‘disaster’.

The article went on to say that “ Looking broadly at the effect of principal turnover on student learning, a researcher from Mount Holyoke College studied 12 years of data from North Carolina public schools. They found that when principals leave, student achievement generally declines for two years.” So these commonplace leadership attrition rates are a huge realistic risk for Cincinnati. It is a dangerous dance of one fancy faux step forward and several irreparable steps backwards.

Principals are not the only temporary hires of MindTrust. Teachers are pulled from TFA (Teach For America) and TNTP (The New Teacher Project). For more background see this article; the author, Doug Martin, has been fighting MindTrust’s ways and writing about such in Indiana for a long time.  A study out of Vanderbilt University lays teacher turnover out in a comprehensive manner: “Using multi-nomial logistic regression, we found the odds of a charter school teacher leaving the profession versus staying in the same school are 132% greater than those of a traditional public school teacher. The odds of a charter school teacher moving schools are 76% greater. Our analysis confirms that much of the explanation of this “turnover gap” lies in differences in the types of teachers that charter schools and traditional public schools hire.” (Italic emphasis mine)

This “type of teacher” is one who has had no previous classroom experience, with extremely abbreviated training times, and whom are promised yet other roles in reform if they meet the contingency of teaching in one of these startup urban situations. Ads are perpetually run. When we, the Badass Teachers Association, lobbied in DC in 2015, we were startled at how very many Representatives’ and Senators’ Education Aides were directly from TFA. Dr. Mitchell Robinson writes: “Teach for America uses its teaching program as a direct line into legislative assistant positions through the Capital Hill Fellows Program.” This is no coincidence on TFA & reformers’ parts. It is intentional through and through. For these fellowship teachers, entrance wages are ridiculously low, the newness pressures are exasperatingly high, and the non-union positions are precariously unprotected. The reward is that they can move on. Teaching is temporary. Never mind the tire tracks on the children’s backs.

Is this the environment that best serves America’s most vulnerable students?

Now, as a final consideration about the atrocious attrition rates associated with opening new charters, please consider the language in THIS CONTRACT. It is the EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF PROPOSED INNOVATION NETWORK SCHOOL AGREEMENT BETWEEN PHALEN LEADERSHIP ACADEMY-INDIANA, INC. AND IPS [Indiana Public Schools] FOR OPERATION OF GEORGE FISHER AS INNOVATION NETWORK SCHOOL. This one sentence leapt out at me:

“In addition, given the importance of having staff experienced in implementing the Project: RESTORE model, if staff turnover exceeds 75 percent in any year, IPS may terminate the agreement.”

Am I the only one totally perturbed and disturbed by that number?? So, in actuality it is A-OKAY……for just shy of three-quarters of the entire school staff from top down and middle to middle, to turnover, creating chaos and churn. Never mind the time and energy resources to replace. Don’t worry about the training aspects, TFA and TNTP can carry that all off in five weeks. Don’t fret about the folks being from the community itself; they will be complete passers-by, stopping in for a brief stay and then headed out to the next time and place. Game board pieces with their marching orders.

FLIP THE TABLES!

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Education, Ohio, Opt out, Public Schools, Schools, Test Refusal

Email to the Education Committee

Brittany's letter

I am sharing because I believe doing so strengthens others.
My email to the Ed Committee about HB420.

Dear Members of the Ohio House Education Committee,

I am writing in response to Amended HB420. The proposal to criminalize what should be in the realm of free speech and academic freedom for Ohio’s educators is misguided at best.

I am not sure exactly when it happened, but it does appear that many legislators lack trust in our educators. Instead of trusting the judgement and discernment of educators as professionals, this proposal hamstrings the very work they dedicate their lives to doing. It is their job to educate. It is their job to put the well-being of their students above all else. These are the very people who should be advocating for whatever their students may need, up to and including the refusing of any standardized test.

Educators should not have to choose between doing the job they were called to do and maintaining their livelihood. It is counterintuitive to suggest that stifling educators will somehow enrich or further the goals of their students. The work of teaching and learning is relational.

I find it ironic that during the week in which school choice is being celebrated nationwide, this body is entertaining legislation that undermines parents’ ability to choose whether or not their child(ren) will participate in standardized tests.

As a professional educator, I understand the fine line I must walk within the walls of my classroom or otherwise in my contractual time. But beyond those hours, I am quite active in a number of education organizations. I give my personal time because I love my profession and I love my students. I firmly stand behind any parent who chooses to refuse standardized tests for their child(ren).

I am asking you to trust in my professionalism, and that of my colleagues. I am asking you to respect the decision of the parents who refuse testing. For whatever the reason.

Thank you for your time and consideration in this matter,
Brittany Alexander
Ohio educator

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Education, Ohio, Public Schools, Schools

50 Days Worth of Blogs About ‘Tornadic’ Tom Vander Ark: Day 13

Day 13

LINKS ARE IN BOLD PRINT!

Getting Smart…..Tom Vander Ark’s big big thing. The only problem is that one little letter is out of place. The “S” in Smart. ANY of Tom Vander Ark’s writings or ideas need that “S” on the end not at the beginning. Getting MartS. Oh wait, one more detail. Pierce the “S” with a stick. Getting Mart$. And in the instance of Tom who is the lover of Tom so much so that daily it is his name and his trumped up credentials that he types more than anything else, so we have to put TOM in it. Getting Tom Mart$. There now we have the reeking reality of his virtual ventures.

I was doing so good daily posting exposures about Tom Vander Ark. I was getting into a rhythm of being able to break things down into topics and just present one part at a time. But, I was interrupted by hell week in education in Ohio. In matter of a little over 36 hours, my city, Youngstown, Ohio was sold into the market place. A non-union market place. Several TomMart$ will be built. The fast and furious rushed-through legislation had obviously been transcribed ‘behind the scenes’ quite a while ago; the dictation is to be model legislation for other TomMart$ Takeovers in Ohio and can be found circulated in almost verbatim manner in too many other states. (I bet if I had the time and energy to put towards it, I could prove that in fact it is close to this tier in all states). Check your state for any of the names of companies, entities, corporations or connections written in this blog series, it might take you a bit but you WILL FIND him.

In one same brief time frame window (the last week in June), our ALEC-founder Governor let it be known that he will announce presidential candidacy on July 21st. #NeverVote4Kasich.  While a crucial charter accountability bill just ooops never really made it all the way on the schedule, other bills slid in budgets made very exacting lopsided proposals for TomMart$ (charters, community schools, blended schools, non-profit schools, online schools, and so on would go the AKAs), PARCC was taken down and Florida’s Jeb Bush’s bullshit AIR put up. No voice of the people. Sheer reform control drove all of this. TomMART$ voice drove it all except for the candidacy announcement. It was preDICTATED.

Throughout this whole round after round of machine gun fire to PUBLIC schools, I kept feeling ‘this is Tom’. ‘Tom is doing this.’ ‘This is directly relates to what I am researching about Tom.’ ‘This is all of pages and pages of research about Tom in government actions right in front of my eyes.’ But, then I would shake off the feelings and think to myself– ‘No, no one person— no one person could be this powerful.’ ‘No one person could cause this level of destruction.’ ‘No one person could dictate this diatribe of destructive directional changes.’ ‘No one person could be this calculating and cold.’ ‘This is America in 2015’ I told myself. One man’s ideas could never dominate and destroy a backbone social institution to this depth. We are a democracy. We vote. Our Voice not One Voice is the American way.

And then the bomb dropped. The Tom bomb. Tom is not only in my state here and there at a handful of schools as I thought. I was going to spend several blogs revealing as though warning that he was coming through Reynoldsburg, Mentor, and Columbus schools. BUT TOM IS HERE. TOM MART$ are here. (Tom the sixth letter of the alphabet expletive ending in -ing) ‘Tornado’ is here. This article was posted in Ohio. iNACOL is Tom. Tom is iNACOL. TomDoom is upon us.

Here is where OHIO is mentioned in the article:

“Ohio Passes Pilot Program for Competency-based Education – Ohio continues to push innovation in helping schools modernize teaching and learning. The budget provides $1 million per year for up to five districts or schools to receive up to $200,000 each for a competency-based education pilot program. The program will begin with planning in the 2015-2016 school year and implementation for three years after that. With this and other efforts already underway in the state, Ohio is working to bring the current one-size-fits-all education system towards a student-based approach, with flexible pacing for student instruction and credit decisions based on competency rather than seat time. The Ohio Budget Bill contains the language on the competency-based education pilot program. Most of the language on the pilot are in the following sections: 263.280, 733.30. (A), and 3317.23. (A).

A summary is below; a more detailed version with additional legislative information is available in the members-only iNACOL Member Forums. We track policy priorities and issues related to the field’s needs as outlined annually in the iNACOL State Policy Frameworks. This report provides background information and recommendations for issues on the critical policy shifts needed to transform K-12 education.”

I was prepared for writing and posting the next two blogs in this series with about twenty four links opened in the two windows and two full pages of notes in OneNote. And now I feel as though I have had the wind knocked completely out of me.  I feel I can not go fast enough, big enough, detailed enough, or long enough to let you know the pervasiveness of TVA’s goals for his TomMART$

iNACOL stands for the International Association of K-12 Online Learning. Tom is currently the treasurer and was at one point the president, but mostly he describes himself as being a DIRECTOR of iNACOL. Typical of anything Tom has his hands in, it is difficult to draw a complete picture of what all is connected and falls ‘underneath’ iNACOL’s directorship. As with all the other groups that Tom ‘directs’. most of what comes up when you search iNACOL are things Tom has written; and if he did not write them, they contain things that he was among the first to be saying or has obviously delegated/demanded that they type. This fact alone of how powerful and present iNACOL is,  would be something he would consider as a boast and it would prove to him that his grand scale compulsion is successfully penetrating what he considers a fossilized social institution. He has financially finagled and egotistically engineered a very exact way and plan  to completely dominate anything written on the topic of education reform.

I am saying flat-out that he intends to change the world. He is almost at an insane level of compulsion in his goal. And he is thoroughly convinced he has the good and right way of it all, and alludes to it all being a “calling” in his life. A ‘God mission’ for which he has been exclusively chosen. And he is succeeding. In his pomposity he, as this self-proclaimed visionary pioneer, TVA is blind to the pain, problems, and poisonous results of his upward ever-broadening spiral surge to his personal summit. He is so maniacal that he is not seeing the negative human factor erasure effects (a blog on that subject later). And if he does see them, he thinks it is all sacrificially necessary. He is in a most deliberate manner killing public schools and the profession of teaching.

From legislation down to the smallest (constant) online plugs for his companies (remember he owns 48 just under the one name of one of his numerous non-profit entities Learn Capital,LLC). iNACOL is his equivalent of air raids of innocent citizenry.

iNACOL is ALEC on a more laser-beamed focus. It is model legislation being methodically pushed upon our state governments. The laws being put in place are securing for TVA the paths by which he will pave paradise and put up his TomMART$.

Tom’s obsessive compulsive goal is to carry ALL PUBLIC SCHOOLS to a place where they can be “charterized” ( yes, I made that word up because cauterized is truly more like what it actually is) into PRIVATE SECTORS with the private sectors under CEOs control of boards which he directs and trains through several of his other non-profit organizations so that he can implement blended schooling (a partial version of his idea) which in turn is the platform on which he can build his TomMART$. His brain scheme ultimate goal, is that every single student (55 million children) in the United States, will have their OWN PERSONALIZED EDUCATION. If you have ever used PANDORA, that is what he shoots for  it to resemble. (so it will be adaptive to each child’s learner needs), with the basics reading, writing, and arithmetic defined by what…. can anyone guess?  Yes, the STANDARDS. Common Core, or better still AIR (his buddy Jeb Bush’s FEE bit). *Much more on all of this in other blogs to come. I wonder at this point if 50 Blogs will be enough space.

dictator (n.) Look up dictator at Dictionary.com
late 14c., from Latin dictator, agent noun from dictare (see dictate (v.)). Transferred sense of “one who has absolute power or authority” in any sphere is from c. 1600. In Latin use, a dictator was a judge in the Roman republic temporarily invested with absolute power.

From Latin dictātor (“a chief magistrate”), from dictō (“dictate, prescribe”), from dīcō (“say, speak”).

Surface analysis is dictate +‎ -or (“(agent)”) “one who dictates”. (wiktionary)

Tom Vander Ark is completing controlling the social media and any and all think tanks related to reform.

Tom Vander Ark is in absolute terms dictating reform. Tom Vander Ark is the DICTATOR of REFORM.Day 13Day 13

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Education, Opt out, Public Schools, Schools, Test Refusal

Go Big or Go Home (Part 1 of 2)

go

Go Big or Go Home

This was my approach to the only two OEA Representative Assemblies I have attended. While this second one lacked the element of surprise in what motion I would make, it certainly sparked some lively debate among delegates.

In a year’s time though, things did change. Most importantly, I built connections with other delegates and friendships with many of them. The level of support was astonishing to me. I am truly grateful for the many people who spoke in favor of and helped with the motion. I must acknowledge Kevin Griffin who agreed to second and help tweak the phrasing umpteen times. We were optimistic and felt we had language that would request a very simple, but significant action.

I submitted the New Business Item (NBI) form and returned to my seat. The day was busy and many people had thoughts to share with me after that paper got turned in. Some wanted to clarify the intent and just get more information. Some wanted to share the concerns they have. Some wanted to share their support. It was pretty overwhelming.

Here is what was submitted:

NBI: OEA will educate members and parents about their right to refuse statewide

standardized tests. OEA will request that ODE notify parents of their right to

refuse any statewide standardized test that is not required for grade promotion or

graduation.

Rationale: This NBI shows that OEA supports parents and their right to direct their

children’s education.

At some point that morning, my local president informed me of news that really touched my heart. She called a vote in our district’s delegation. They unanimously voted to support the NBI and to have her speak in favor of it on their behalf. That means more to me than I can adequately express. I am grateful to Mary Kennedy and our entire Hilliard EA delegation for their support.

As I approached the microphone, an inexplicable calm washed over me. I had sobbed while writing my speech the night before and felt certain I wouldn’t make it through without crying. I technically didn’t, but I’m OK with that. I can rarely talk about what is happening to my students without crying. So what if that happened to be in front of a large number of people? I didn’t feel nervous, just sad.

I finished and Kevin eloquently explained further. He made excellent points about the sharp differences in how school districts are handling refusal requests. He even quoted from the NEA President’s blog to show how far-reaching the support for parents’ right to refuse the tests is. I was again humbled and blessed that he agreed to help.

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