Education, Ohio, Public Schools, School Board

Oh Really, Gunlock?

I find it very interesting that Mr. Gunlock is still trotting out the same tired old rhetoric about the OGTs measuring eighth-grade knowledge even after he quit the state school board mid-term. We have asked for proof of this claim over and over yet he has failed to provide it. I would love to read any information you could provide on the topic, Mr. Gunlock. Of course this is not even the real problem anyway. The problem is anyone who thinks that a child’s score on some tests is a true indicator of his readiness for the future. You did not take exit exams, Mr. Gunlock, yet I am sure that you consider yourself a success.

Why do we continue to insist on giving these exams and tying them to graduation when study after study shows that this is not only unnecessary, it can actually be harmful? We are one of only fourteen states in the entire country that require children to pass exams to graduate. Are those thirty-six other states full of kids that are not prepared for the future? Of course not.

As for business leaders complaining about a lack of qualified candidates for the workplace, I have yet to hear that from an actual business leader. A 2014 study done by The National Association of Colleges and Employers and published in Forbes magazine found that the top ten skills employers seek are:

  1. Ability to work in a team structure
  2. Ability to make decisions and solve problems (tie)
  3. Ability to communicate verbally with people inside and outside an organization
  4. Ability to plan, organize and prioritize work
  5. Ability to obtain and process information
  6. Ability to analyze quantitative data
  7. Technical knowledge related to the job
  8. Proficiency with computer software programs
  9. Ability to create and/or edit written reports
  10. Ability to sell and influence others

Is there any proof that these new tests measure ANY of these qualities? How can we know for sure when no one has ever seen these tests?

I would also like to know why you left the state school board so abruptly, Mr. Gunlock. Was it because you couldn’t bear the thought of admitting that perhaps you got it wrong? That maybe, just maybe, these kids are not the problem? That the fact that only 24% of students scored proficient or above on the Geometry test may have more to do with the actual test than the kids themselves, regardless of how you feel about them only needing to answer 35% of the questions correctly? I am inclined to believe the children who took these tests when they tell me that there were questions on there on topics that they had not yet covered in class. Of course that would only make sense given that, despite what the name implies, these end-of-course tests are given in March and April.

Is taking the word of  PARCC about its cut scores even though their tests were deemed so poor that we dropped them after only one year fair? How about switching testing vendors after one year while simultaneously raising the cut scores of the new tests? Or giving these same kids three different sets of Math and ELA tests in three years while providing little to no information to districts about these ever-changing testing requirements?

Does it matter that some students were taking these tests online while some used paper and pencil? While PARCC claims that it did a study and found no discernable difference, the results from states around the country say otherwise. As a matter of fact, Derek Briggs, professor of research and evaluation methodology at the University of Colorado at Boulder, who also happens to serve on the technical advisory committee for both PARCC and Smarter Balanced (whose tests are created by the same vendor we now use for all of our state tests), is quoted as saying, “In the short term, on policy grounds, you need to come up with an adjustment, so that if a [student] is taking a computer version of the test, it will never be held against [him or her]”. Yet we are still holding current juniors responsible for the results of these tests that nearly everyone else was given a safe harbor from.

Like Representative Fedor said recently, the adults got it wrong, not our children. I am incredibly grateful to her and the remaining school board members who recognize that we have a serious problem here that needs to be addressed so that the 35,000 of our current juniors who are not on track to graduate next year get the opportunity to do so.

Written by Mandy Jablonski, Ohio BAT

Standard
Education, Ohio, Public Schools, Schools

#DumpDeVos

A proud public school parent writes a sample letter to HELP Committee Senators urging their “No” vote in the confirmation of Betsy DeVos for Secretary of Education. Her fantastic letter is below for use as-is or modified as needed.

Dear Senator {insert name},

On January 11, 2017 you begin the immensely important task of determining the fitness of our president-elect’s choice for Secretary of Education. Your conclusion will ultimately decide the direction of our education system for at least the next 4 years. Undoubtedly, this is a decision neither you nor your colleagues take lightly.

“Teaching should be such that what is offered is perceived as a valuable gift and not as hard duty. Never regard study as duty but as the enviable opportunity to learn to know the liberating influence of beauty in the realm of the spirit for your own personal joy and to the profit of the community to which your later work belongs.”
― Albert Einstein

Teachers understand the impact they have on shaping the lives of young people. Every day they work tirelessly to provide each child an opportunity to discover their full potential and to go forth as engaged and productive citizens. Teachers know their legacy is embedded in the multitude of ways their students influence our society for generations. As such, we must demand the individual serving as the principal adviser to the President on all federal policies, programs and activities related to education in the United States understand this intrinsically. Betsy DeVos is not that individual.

Betsy DeVos has spent her career and considerable fortune undermining public education. Leading the charge to voucherize and privatize education should not be accomplishments touted on the resume of the individual charged with shaping policies and programs for our public education system. Educators, parents and other public education stakeholders recognize our current education model can and should be improved to better serve the needs of all students. We need to change our reliance on high-stakes testing, increase funding not continue to funnel funds out of our public schools and continuously empower our teachers to address the socio-economic and emotional obstacles their students face. Betsy DeVos’ effect on Michigan’s school system should serve as all the evidence one needs to determine her vision for education is dangerous for the youth of our nation.

Betsy DeVos regularly lobbied to block legislation that would require for profit institutions to be transparent in their use of public funds or even share student achievement. Public schools must consistently demonstrate fiscal responsibility to the communities they serve and budgets are a matter of public record. Public schools accept every student regardless of race, religion, sexual orientation, economic status or mental ability. Charter schools and parochial schools do not operate under the same inclusivity requirements.

Reallocating public funds to private for profit institutions and parochial schools under the guise of increased competition is at best foolish. Time and again charter schools fail, forcing parents who have utilized vouchers to find alternate schools for their children. The charter that just failed previously forced their neighborhood school to close leaving working parents with little or no options for their children. Often the people this affects most are those living in economically disadvantaged areas and people of color. We have already seen the re-segregation of schools in urban areas as vouchers and school choice facilitate white flight.

If we are sincere in our desire to propel our educational system forward, it is imperative we appoint a true champion of education. This individual must have spent their career in the service of educating our youth. This individual must have intimate knowledge of what it is like actually be an educator. This person must not be Betsy Devos. I have extreme optimism that as a member of the Senate Health Education Labor and Pensions Committee you will conclude Betsy DeVos is not fit to lead our educational system forward. I sincerely appreciate your NO vote on Betsy DeVos.

Kindest regards,

Jessica Bosak

Registered Voter

Constituent of Senators Brown and Portman, Ohio 15th Congressional District

Standard
Education, Ohio, Public Schools, School Board

Thank You to A.J. Wagner

14804946_1358697560837794_1144925745_nDear Mr. Wagner,

Our first interaction was a tumultuous one. We were forthright and bold in sharing our disagreements with the proposed changes to Ohio’s 5 of 8 rule. What followed from that exchange stunned us. In reply, you sent a request to meet with members of Ohio BATs in an effort to understand how policies play out in the classrooms across our state.

Not only did you spend nearly four hours of your time meeting with us, you made it abundantly clear that December day, and each subsequent day in service with the Board, that you stand with the students, parents, and educators of Ohio. While you have said repeatedly that meeting with us and really hearing us is not some extraordinary thing, while stressing that public servants are supposed to do just that, our collective experience indicates otherwise.

The encouragement and the validation felt by this first meeting rippled throughout our group. It provided hope, where before, we felt only despair. For that, there are not words enough to express our gratitude.

Throughout your two years on the Board, your steadfast commitment to public education cannot be misconstrued or understated. There was never doubt that your guiding principle is concern for our young people. You demonstrated a gracious spirit while you worked to uphold the aims of a true democratic public education, despite some of the backlash you faced. Your stand on the right side of history will have lasting implications for anyone fortunate enough to have crossed your path.

We appreciate your efforts as an Ohio School Board member, although we mourn the loss of a terrific ally. Your shoes will not be easily filled. We wish you well during this time of transition in your family’s life.

In Sincere Gratitude,

Ohio BATs

Standard
Education, Elections, Ohio, Public Schools, Schools

Rep. Andy Brenner—you have been called out!

are-you-up-for-the-challenge

via Janet Breneman
·
************************
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
************************
I CHALLENGE MY OPPONENT REP. ANDREW BRENNER TO A DEBATE!

Columbus- October 3, 2016

Democratic candidate Janet Breneman, candidate for the Ohio House of Representatives 67th District, challenges incumbent Andy Brenner to a debate.

Janet Breneman, a progressive education and health advocate, challenging the seat of State Representative Andrew Brenner, says it’s time for citizens to break the stranglehold, which Brenner has held on voters.

“For too long voters have accepted the empty rhetoric of Andy Brenner- a lackluster mouthpiece of local conservatives- and now we are holding him accountable.”

Brenner further had the audacity to text me stating “I’m in a Republican District where the index is over 65%, why are you running against me?’

A recent position statement by media outlet Cleveland.Com notes the state wide concern regards the performance and costs of charter schools-and specifically lambastes Andy Brenner for referring to public education as “socialism”, a statement for which Brenner later apologized.

“It’s the teachers of this country, and public schools which provide the backbone for education in our great country”, adds Janet Breneman. “I challenge him to a debate on the topic, and I want the public to see whether he can rise to that challenge, or cower.

Further, I hereby now ask Andrew Brenner to return the campaign donations he accepted from ECOT founder, William Lager.

Ohio taxpayers are spending $108 million for only approximately 8,000 ECOT students to attend- which is significantly less than what ECOT said was their attendance figures, according to the Ohio Dept. of Education.

Janet Breneman may be reached at: BrenemanForOhio@gmail.com or by phone
419-410-0017

debate

 

Standard
Education, Ohio, Public Schools, Schools

Dare to Discuss the Data?

data-secuirty

A little bit of information.
The inequality of education in Ohio.
A superintendent from SE Ohio compiled this.

An analysis using Ohio Department of Education Report Card, Ohio Facilities Construction Commission’s Valuation Rankings, and the Ohio Department of Education Typology finds the following:

Not one district with MORE than 18% poverty received an “A” on Indicators Met.

524 districts have more than 18% poverty.

83% of schools have more than 18% poverty.

Only two districts received an “A” on Performance Index Score.

One has 0% poverty and the other has 9% poverty.

One is ranked in the top 16% while the other is in the top 10% for property value.

None of the 100 poorest schools, by property valuation, received above a “D” or an “F” in Indicators Met.

No Rural High Poverty Districts received anything higher than a “D” on Indicators Met.

3% of Rural Districts received an “A” or “B” in Indicators Met.

No Small Town High Poverty Districts received anything higher than a “D” on indicators Met.

4% of Small Town Districts received a “B” on Indicators Met, there were no “A.”

All but one “A” for Indicators Met was received by a Suburban District.

There are No High Poverty or Medium Poverty Districts with the Suburban District typology.

All but one Urban District received an “F” on Indicators Met. One received a “D.

Also, click here: to view a PowerPoint for graphic illustrations demonstrating the same.

Standard
Education, Ohio, Public Schools, Schools

Expressing Gratitude for Judge French’s Ruling Regarding ECOT

thank-you-2012-680x300

Ohio BATs, affiliated with Badass Teachers Association
October 4, 2016

The Honorable Jenifer French
Judge, Franklin County Court of Common Pleas
Common Pleas Courthouse, Courtroom 6A
345 South High Street, 6th Floor
Columbus, OH 43215

Dear Judge French:

We are writing to you today with our sincere gratitude on behalf of the students we serve in our learning environments every day. The ECOT decision handed down by you will have a rippling effect on the virtual school industry in Ohio.

For the past nearly twenty years, our state has operated all of its 614 school districts under an unconstitutional funding system. Further compounding this problem is the funding of charter schools, including virtual schools like ECOT. This is the crux of the real problem with our public schools. Many of our public schools are underfunded, especially the schools serving students who are living in poverty. Quite frankly, public schools serving students who live in poverty require more resources to ensure all students are successful (yet they continue to have those resources stripped). We do not define success by using test scores.
ECOT receives higher per pupil funding than most all public schools and they continue to fail our students . . . most often our most vulnerable students. We wonder what our public schools would look like if each of our students received the same amount without restrictions. We are quite confident we can do a much better job than ECOT. We already know we do a better job with less money.
Those of us who advocate on behalf of our students everyday oftentimes feel we are not heard and we feel helpless – not a good feeling! Then a decision from a judge reinforces our
determination to ensure our students are provided with everything necessary to be successful.

Again, thank you!

Ohio BAT Administrators

 

Standard
Education, Ohio, Public Schools, Schools

Teaching in Triage

triage-schools

Written by Emily Alberty.

As posted in the public Facebook group Cleveland Caucus to Reclaim Our Schools/CLE United Rank & File Educators (CURE).

I wrote this last March, after looking outside at the school playground and seeing the Cleveland police seemingly reenacting the events surrounding the death of Tamir Rice.

I feel like everyday I see posts from teachers about current or former CMSD students who have gone missing, been shot, or have been killed. Our city and our babies need help. I had to get this off my chest.

“Cleveland is a war zone,
and classrooms are the triage.
Teachers are the doctors,
to students who are on loan.

“Get to school. You can make it!”
But will their life be taken?
Walk past the memorial,
and let us give you a tutorial.
Another Cleveland kid who did not make it.

Schools are hospitals.
Poverty and violence are the infections.
Breathe, bandage, repeat.
Do they have food to eat?
Cleveland students are in this.

Why are test scores low?
Because Cleveland kids are taking blows.”

[The author of this blog saw this on September 21st. BUT the author of this blog finds it worthy to point out that the original post was made on August 29th, 2016…. PRIOR TO the unacceptable (and unnervingly similar) death of 13-year-old Tyre King in Columbus, Ohio.]

aug-29

Standard